The Appalachian Forest: A Search for Roots and Renewal

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The Appalachian Forest: A Search for Roots and Renewal, published by Stackpole Books, 1998.

More than a biological overview, The Appalachian Forest is also an exploration of Appalachian life and its many contradictions, including the poverty of a region so rich in natural resources. From Cherokees to bear hunters, this book views the mountains from a continuum of perspectives.

Available from Amazon.com

The Appalachian Forest

Reviews

“One of the three best natural history books published in 1998…a  ‘must’ read’.
Asheville (NC) Citizen-Times

“A comprehensive study, personalized with anecdotes of the author’s own experiences … should not be limited to the geographic area in question, as it addresses broader issues of ecology, conservation, and recreational use of public lands.” —Library Journal

“Bolgiano takes on nothing less than the comprehensive history of the southern Appalachian chain … With an unmistakable passion for the land (and) well-researched and meticulously compiled facts…Bolgiano offers a studied and heartfelt call to preserve the mountains.” 
TheWashington Post

“Bolgiano weaves her personal experiences in mountain living with beautifully written sketches of the region’s biological and human history.” 
TheRoanoke (VA) Times

“The great strength of this important volume (is that) Bolgiano recognizes the complex relationships between Appalachian human culture, the limitations (of) economic distress, and the ecological realities of the mountain forests.  At the same time, she does offer hope.” 
Appalachian Heritage

“Covers the geology, flora, fauna, and human story from pre-history to the present…Despite pollution, sprawl and other challenges, Bolgiano leavens her concern by voicing delight at certain signs of progress…and ultimately finds that the southern Appalachians remain ‘so lovely, they lull you into believing anything is possible.’ Even saving them.” 
Audubon Naturalist News